The Best Books for Preschoolers and Kindergarteners | From Blue Bells and Cockle ShellsThese are our favorite picture books. This list has been accumulated over the last 2 1/2 decades and is still evolving. Be sure to check our other recommended reading lists for book for all seasons and holidays!

  1. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, by Judith Viorst – originally published in 1972, children everywhere can still relate to having a really bad day like Alexander’s. Alexander knew it was going to be a terrible day when he woke up with gum in this hair. And it got worse… His best friend deserted him. There was no dessert in his lunch bag. And, on top of all that, there were lima beans for dinner and kissing on TV!
  2. All About Alfie by Hughes, Shirley (2012), by Shirley Hughes – Alfie and his best friend Bernard have a day out full of surprises when they go to meet a very great person indeed. What’s more there are secret dens to explore, snowy skies, birthday fun and a very unexpected visitor on a special night-time trip!
  3. Angus and the Cat, by Marjorie Flack – Angus the terrier has to share his home with a new cat who eats Angus’s food and sits in his favorite places. How will they ever get along?
  4. Are You My Mother?, by P.D. Eastman – A baby bird goes in search of his mother in this hilarious classic story, perfect for babies and toddlers!
  5. Bear Snores On, by Karma Wilson – The first and bets book in the popular series about Bear. One by one, a whole host of different animals and birds find their way out of the cold and into Bear’s cave to warm up. But even after the tea has been brewed and the corn has been popped, Bear just snores on! See what happens when he finally wakes up and finds his cave full of uninvited guests—all of them having a party without him!
  6. Beautiful Oops!, by Barney Saltzberg – Barney Saltzberg, the effervescent spirit behind Good Egg, offers a one-of-a-kind interactive book that shows young readers how every mistake is an opportunity to make something beautiful. A singular work of imagination, creativity, and paper engineering, Beautiful Oops! is filled with pop-ups, lift-the-flaps, tears, holes, overlays, bends, smudges, and even an accordion “telescope”—each demonstrating the magical transformation from blunder to wonder.
  7. Big Red Barn, by Margaret Wise Brown – There were horses and sheep and goats and geese–and a jaunty old scarecrow leaning on his hoe. And they all lived together by the big red barn. In joyous and exuberant. Felicia Bond lovingly evokes Margaret Wise Brown’s simple, rhythmic text about the cycle of a day on a farm, where a family of animals peacefully plays and sleeps.
  8. Blueberries for Sal, by Robert McCloskey, Kuplink, kuplank, kuplunk! Sal and her mother a picking blueberries to can for the winter. But when Sal wanders to the other side of Blueberry Hill, she discovers a mama bear preparing for her own long winter. Meanwhile Sal’s mother is being followed by a small bear with a big appetite for berries! Will each mother go home with the right little one? With its expressive line drawings and charming story, Blueberries for Sal has won readers’ hearts since its first publication in 1948.
  9. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?, by Bill Martin Jr./Eric Carle – A big happy frog, a plump purple cat, a handsome blue horse, and a soft yellow duck–all parade across the pages of this delightful book. Children will immediately respond to Eric Carle’s flat, boldly colored collages. Combined with Bill Martin’s singsong text, they create unforgettable images of these endearing animals.
  10. Caps for Sale is a timeless classic, in print for over fifty years, and beloved by generations of readers. This easy-to-read story about a peddler and a band of mischievous monkeys is filled with warmth, humor, and simplicity and teaches children about problem and resolution. Children will delight in following the peddler’s efforts to outwit the monkeys and will ask to read it again and again. This is an excellent easy-to-read book that includes repetition, patterns, and colors, perfect for early readers.
  11. The Cat in the Hat – Poor Dick and Sally. It’s cold and wet and they’re stuck in the house with nothing to do . . . until a giant cat in a hat shows up, transforming the dull day into a madcap adventure and almost wrecking the place in the process! Written by Dr. Seuss in 1957 in response to the concern that “pallid primers [with] abnormally courteous, unnaturally clean boys and girls’ were leading to growing illiteracy among children, The Cat in the Hat (the first Random House Beginner Book) changed the way our children learn how to read.
  12. Children of the Forest The children of the forest live deep in the roots of an old pine tree. They collect wild mushrooms and blueberries and shelter under toadstools when it rains. They play with the squirrels and frogs, and when autumn comes, they collect and prepare food to see them through the long winter, until the warm spring breeze starts to blow.
  13. Chrysanthemum Written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes, the nationally bestselling and celebrated creator of Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse, Owen, and Kitten’s First Full Moon, Chrysanthemum is a funny and honest school story about teasing, self-esteem, and acceptance to share all year round.
  14. Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type Farmer Brown has a problem. His cows like to type. All day long he hears: Click, clack, moo. Click, clack, moo. Click, clack, moo. But Farmer Brown’s problems REALLY begin when his cows start leaving him notes…Come join the fun as a bunch of literate cows turn Farmer Brown’s farm upside-down!
  15. Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs – If food dropped like rain from the sky, wouldn’t it be marvelous! Or would it? It could, after all, be messy. And you’d have no choice. What if you didn’t like what fell? Or what if too much came? Have you ever thought of what it might be like to be squashed flat by a pancake?
  16. Dear Zoo is twenty-five years old — and still as popular as ever! And with an updated look, this classic children’s storybook about a youngster loooking for a perfect pet is sure to delight a new generation of readers!
  17. Dogger – When Dave loses his favorite toy, Dogger, he is very sad. But when Dogger turns up for sale at the neighborhood fair, everything seems all right—until someone else buys him before Dave can get the money! Filled with humor and Shirley Hughes’s artful touch, this is a book for young readers to tackle by themselves, as well as a delight to read aloud.
  18. Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! – When a bus driver takes a break from his route, a very unlikely volunteer springs up to take his place-a pigeon! But you’ve never met one like this before. As he pleads, wheedles, and begs his way through the book, children will love being able to answer back and decide his fate. In his hilarious picture book debut, popular cartoonist Mo Willems perfectly captures a preschooler’s temper tantrum.
  19. Duck on a Bike – Caldecott Honor winner David Shannon applies his wonderful off-beat humor to the story of a duck who decides to try riding a bike–and loves it! Another young, funny book perfect for reading aloud.
  20. Each Peach Pear Plum is a timeless picture book classic from the bestselling illustrator/author team Janet and Allan Ahlberg, creators of Peepo!. Each beautifully illustrated page encourages young children to interact with the picture to find the next fairy tale and nursery rhyme character.
  21. Elmer the elephant is bright-colored patchwork all over. No wonder the other elephants laugh at him! If he were ordinary elephant color, the others might stop laughing. That would make Elmer feel better, wouldn’t it? The surprising conclusion of David McKee’s comical fable is a celebration of individuality and the power of laughter.
  22. Flight School – Although little Penguin has the soul of an eagle, his body wasn’t built to soar. But Penguin has an irrepressible spirit, and he adamantly follows his dreams to flip, flap, fly! Even if he needs a little help with the technical parts, this penguin is ready to live on the wind.
  23. Freight Train “Clear bright illustrations show all the cars of a train bringing the reader the excitement of movement through day and night, country and city.”–Booklist.
  24. Go, Dog Go Reading goes to the dogs in this timeless Beginner Book edited by Dr. Seuss. From big dogs and little dogs to red, green, and blue dogs, dogs going up and dogs going fast . . . who knew dogs were so busy? And laughter will ensue at the repeated question “Do you like my hat?” Like P. D. Eastman’s classic Are You My Mother? Go, Dog. Go! has been a go-to favorite for over fifty years, leaving audiences of all breeds wagging their tails with delight.
  25. A Good Day “PreSchool-Grade 1—Employing the thick lines and uncluttered illustrations reminiscent of his work in Kitten’s First Full Moon (Greenwillow, 2004), Henkes tells the story of four creatures who start out having a bad day. A bird loses his favorite feather, a dog gets her leash tangled in a fence, a fox loses his mother, and a squirrel drops her nut. But then, the squirrel finds an even bigger nut, the fox is reunited with his mother, the dog frees her leash, and the bird discovers he can fly higher than ever, even without his feather. The animals’ triumphant expressions and perky postures, in sharp contrast to their former dejected demeanors, bear witness to the fact that the bad day has turned out to be a good one after all. In a surprising twist, a young girl finds the bird’s feather, “tuck[s] it behind her ear,” and runs to her mother shouting, “What a good day!” A reprise of all four creatures in the last scene as the excited child seeks out her parent is the perfect conclusion. Full-page, pastel-hued watercolor-and-ink illustrations appear framed opposite each page of large, brief text. This gentle story affords an opportunity to introduce the very young to ways of dealing with life’s small disappointments. A fine choice for the lap set.” — Marianne Saccardi, formerly at Norwalk Community College, CT
  26. Good Night, Gorilla “‘Good night, Gorilla,’ says the weary watchman as he walks by the gorilla cage on his nightly rounds at the zoo. The gorilla answers by quietly pickpocketing the guard’s keys, stealthily trailing him, and unlocking the cages of every animal the oblivious fellow bids goodnight to. Looking much like an exhausted father, the uniformed guard traipses home toward his cottage, while the lonely zoo animals softly parade behind him. The animals manage to slip into his bedroom and nestle unnoticed near his sleepy wife–until the bold little gorilla goes so far as to snuggle up beside her as she turns out the light. Author and illustrator Peggy Rathmann (creator of the Caldecott-winning Officer Buckle and Gloria) relies more on the nuances of her jewel-toned pictures than on words to pace this giggly bedtime story, making it perfect for observant preschoolers. In one inky-black spread, Rathmann lets only the shocked, wide-open eyes of the guard’s wife tell us that the gorilla has been detected! Tiny details such as the faithful, banana-toting mouse and sky-bound pink balloon that appear in each picture keep this book fresh, magical, and fun–even after countless bedtime readings. (Baby to preschool)” –Gail Hudson
  27. Good-Night, Owl! Owl couldn’t sleep — not while the bees were buzzing, the crows croaking, the starlings chittering, and the jays creaming. Every time there seemed to be some peace and quite, someone else landed in the hollow tree and woke Owl up again. Would Owl ever get any rest? Pat Hutchins’s simple, cumulative story ends with a surprising twist that will send children off to sleep laughing.
  28. Goodnight Moon In a great green room, tucked away in bed, is a little bunny. “Goodnight room, goodnight moon.” And to all the familiar things in the softly lit room–to the picture of the three little bears sitting in chairs, to the clocks and his socks, to the mittens and the kittens, to everything one by one–he says goodnight. In this classic of modern children’s literature, beloved by generations of readers and listeners, the quiet poetry of the words and the gentle, lulling illustrations combine to make a perfect book for the end of the day.
  29. Gossie Meet Gossie, a small yellow gosling who loves to wear bright red boots—every day. One morning Gossie can’t find her beloved boots. She looks everywhere for them: under the bed, over the wall, even in the barn. Preschoolers will enjoy helping Gossie find her red boots and delight in where Gossie finally finds them.
  30. The Great Fuzz Frenzy Deep, deep down in their underground town, the prairie dogs live in harmony–until a mysterious, fluorescent, very fuzzy thing (otherwise known as a tennis ball) rolls down their hole. When the prairie dogs discover that they can pluck and pull the fuzz into fabulous fashions, their fear quickly turns to curiosity, then delight, then pure greed. The frenzy that erupts threatens to tear apart the prairie-dog town forever. But when mean ol’ Big Bark is kidnapped after taking all the fuzz for himself, the prairie dogs come to the rescue and remember the true meaning of community.
  31. Green Eggs and Ham “Do you like green eggs and ham?” asks Sam-I-am in this Beginner Book by Dr. Seuss. In a house or with a mouse? In a boat or with a goat? On a train or in a tree? Sam keeps asking persistently. With unmistakable characters and signature rhymes, Dr. Seuss’s beloved favorite has cemented its place as a children’s classic. In this most famous of cumulative tales, the list of places to enjoy green eggs and ham, and friends to enjoy them with, gets longer and longer. Follow Sam-I-am as he insists that this unusual treat is indeed a delectable snack to be savored everywhere and in every way.
  32. The Gruffalo A mouse is taking a stroll through the deep, dark wood when along comes a hungry fox, then an owl, and then a snake. The mouse is good enough to eat but smart enough to know this, so he invents . . . the gruffalo! As Mouse explains, the gruffalo is a creature with terrible claws, and terrible tusks in its terrible jaws, and knobbly knees and turned-out toes, and a poisonous wart at the end of its nose. But Mouse has no worry to show. After all, there’s no such thing as a gruffalo. . . .
  33. Grumpy Bird Bird wakes up feeling grumpy. Too grumpy to eat or play — too grumpy even to fly. “Looks like I’m walking today,” says Bird. He walks past Sheep, who offers to keep him company. He walks past Rabbit, who also could use a walk. Raccoon, Beaver, and Fox join in, too. Before he knows it, a little exercise and companionship help Bird shake his bad mood. This winsome, refreshingly original picture book is sure to help kids (and grown-ups) giggle away theirs, too!
  34. Guess How Much I Love You “Guess how much I love you,” says Little Nutbrown Hare. Little Nutbrown Hare shows his daddy how much he loves him: as wide as he can reach and as far as he can hop. But Big Nutbrown Hare, who can reach farther and hop higher, loves him back just as much. Well then Little Nutbrown Hare loves him right up to the moon, but that’s just halfway to Big Nutbrown Hare’s love for him.
  35. Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy With cumulative rhymes and sunny ink and watercolor illustrations, this international favorite chronicles the escapades of our hero Hairy and his crew of five kooky canines. In this introductory book in the Hairy McLary series, all the pooches-from big-as-a-horse Hercules Morse to Schnitzel von Krumm with the very low tum-meet their feline match.
  36. Handa’s Surprise Handa puts seven delicious fruits in a basket to take to her friend, Akeyo. But as she walks, carrying the basket on her head, various creatures steal her fruits. When she shares her basket with Akeyo, it’s Handa who gets the biggest surprise.
  37. Harold and the Purple Crayon “One night, after thinking it over for some time, Harold decided to go for a walk in the moonlight.” Armed only with an oversized purple crayon, young Harold draws himself a landscape full of wonder and excitement. Full of funny twists and surprises, this joyful story shows just how far your imagination can take you. Harold and the Purple Crayon has delighted readers of all ages for over fifty years.
  38. Harry the Dirty Dog Harry is a white dog with black spots who loves everything . . . except baths. So one day before bath time, Harry runs away. He plays outside all day long, digging and sliding in everything from garden soil to pavement tar. By the time he returns home, Harry is so dirty he looks like a black dog with white spots. His family doesn’t even recognize him!
  39. Have You Seen My Duckling? In this Caldecott Honor winner, a mother duck loses her eighth duckling, and asks the other pond animals for help (though the missing one is never lost, only cleverly concealed in each picture).
  40. Here Are My Hands invites very young children to respond spontaneously and creatively as they learn the parts of the body. The rhyming text and bold illustrations do more than name the eyes, ears, nose, and toes. By featuring children of many different backgrounds, the book quietly celebrates the commonality of people around the world.
  41. I Spy With My Little Eye Have you ever played the I-spy game? Debut artist Edward Gibbs takes the game to a whole new level in this picture book with spy holes. Peeking through the pages, children will be able to spot a different colored animal every time, and guess what it is using a simple, factual clue. Bold illustrations and die-cut holes will absorb young readers as they learn about colors and animal names.
  42. I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato Lola is a fussy eater. A very fussy eater. She won’t eat her carrots (until her brother Charlie reveals that they’re orange twiglets from Jupiter). She won’t eat her mashed potatoes (until Charlie explains that they’re cloud fluff from the pointiest peak of Mount Fuji). There are many things Lola won’t eat, including – and especially – tomatoes. Or will she? Two endearing siblings star in a witty story about the triumph of imagination over proclivity.
  43. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie If a hungry little mouse shows up on your doorstep, you might want to give him a cookie. And if you give him a cookie, he’ll ask for a glass of milk. He’ll want to look in a mirror to make sure he doesn’t have a milk mustache, and then he’ll ask for a pair of scissors to give himself a trim…
  44. Inch by Inch In this classic book, a winsome, winning inchworm is proud of his ability to measure anything under the sun.
  45. Ira Sleeps Over Ira is thrilled to spend the night at Reggie’s, until his sister raises the question of whether he should take his teddy bear.
  46. Is Your Mama a Llama? This robust reissue follows lovable Lloyd the llama on his quest to find out what percentage of the baby animal population has llamas for mamas. The rhymes are original and infectious, and the riddles are sure to have children shouting out the answers in anticipation of turning the page.
  47. It’s Not Easy Being a Bunny Meet P. J. Funnybunny in this humorous and touching Beginner Book by Marilyn Sadler and Roger Bollen. It’s Not Easy Being a Bunny tells the “tail” of P.J. and his quest to become something other than what he is. Is it more fun to be a bear, a bird, or a pig? Read along as P.J. tries to determine who he is—and where he belongs.
  48. Jamberry A young boy and a bear joyously romp through the land of berries where there are raspberry rabbits and a brassberry band with elephants skating on strawberry jam!
  49. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat Joseph had a little overcoat, but it was full of holes—just like this book! When Joseph’s coat got too old and shabby, he made it into a jacket. But what did he make it into after that? And after that? As children turn the pages of this book, they can use the die-cut holes to guess what Joseph will be making next from his amazing overcoat, while they laugh at the bold, cheerful artwork and learn that you can always make something, even out of nothing.
  50. Jump, Frog, Jump! – “This is the turtle that slid into the pond and ate the snake that dropped from a branch and swallowed the fish that swam after the frog — JUMP, FROG, JUMP!” This infectious cumulative tale will soon have the young frogs you know jumping and chanting with joy.
  51. Katie Loves the Kittens Katie is so excited when Sara Ann brings home three little kittens that she can’t stop herself from howling “AROOOOO!” and trying to run after them. She loves them so much!But Katie’s enthusiasm frightens the kitties, and she’s sad when they run away from her. Don’t they know that she just wants to play?
  52. Kitten’s First Full Moon The nationally bestselling picture book about a kitten, the moon, and a bowl of milk, written by the celebrated author and illustrator Kevin Henkes, was awarded a Caldecott Medal.
  53. Ladybug Girl When Lulu puts on her ladybug costume, she becomes Ladybug Girl, a superhero who uses her imagination to have adventures right in her own backyard. Her dog, Bingo the basset hound, is always by her side and the two prove that they are not too little to explore nature, build forts, and make their own big fun.
  54. Library Lion Miss Merriweather, the head librarian, is very particular about rules in the library. No running allowed. And you must be quiet. But when a lion comes to the library one day, no one is sure what to do. There aren’t any rules about lions in the library. And, as it turns out, this lion seems very well suited to library visiting. His big feet are quiet on the library floor. He makes a comfy backrest for the children at story hour. And he never roars in the library, at least not anymore. But when something terrible happens, the lion quickly comes to the rescue in the only way he knows how. Michelle Knudsen’s disarming story, illustrated by the matchless Kevin Hawkes in an expressive timeless style, will win over even the most ardent of rule keepers.
  55. The Library Elizabeth Brown doesn’t like to play with dolls, and she doesn’t like to skate. What she does like to do is read books. Lots of them, all the time. Over the years, her collection has grown to such enormous proportions that there’s not even room in Elizabeth’s house for Elizabeth. The way she solves the problem will warm the hearts of book lovers, young and old.
  56. Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse Lilly loves everything about school, especially her cool teacher, Mr. Slinger. But when Lilly brings her purple plastic purse and its treasures to school and can’t wait until sharing time, Mr. Slinger confiscates her prized possessions. Lilly’s fury leads to revenge and then to remorse and she sets out to make amends.
  57. Little Blue Truck Beep! Beep! Beep! Meet Blue. A muddy country road is no match for this little pick up–that is, until he gets stuck while pushing a dump truck out of the muck. Luckily, Blue has made a pack of farm animal friends along his route. And they’re willing to do whatever it takes to get their pal back on the road. Filled with truck sounds and animals noises, here is a rollicking homage to the power of friendship and the rewards of helping others.
  58. Little Bunny Follows His Nose What’s a bunny to do on such a fine sunny day? Follow his nose! Down the hill, into the forest, and through a vegetable garden, Little Bunny does just that! Kids will love all the wonderful things there are to smell—pine, peach, roses and more—in this classic scratch-and-sniff book originally published in 1971.
  59. Little Fur Family The Little Fur Family tells the story of a little fur child’s day in the woods. The day ends when his big fur parents tuck him in bed “all soft and warm,” and sing him to sleep with a lovely bedtime song.Cuddle up to a classic with this timeless story! Garth William’s soft illustrations join Margaret Wise Brown’s rhythmic text to create a gentle lullaby. Bound in imitation fur, Little Fur Family is sure to comfort and delight.
  60. The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear First published in 1984, a picture book in which the Little Mouse will do all he can to save his strawberry from the Big, Hungry Bear, even if it means sharing it with the reader. The Little Mouse and the Big Hungry Bear are known and loved by millions of children around the world. Little Mouse loves strawberries, but so does the bear…How will Little Mouse stop the bear from eating his freshly picked, red, ripe strawberry.
  61. Madeline A Caldecott Honor Book, Madeline truly needs no introduction. An enduring classic, Madeline continues to enchant readers more than seventy years after its first publication. Nothing frightens Madeline—not tigers, not mice, not even getting sick. To Madeline, a trip to the hospital is a grand adventure.
  62. Mama, Do You Love Me? This beloved story of a child testing the limits of her independence, and a mother who reassuringly proves that a parents love is unconditional and everlasting is a perfect first book for toddlers.
  63. Maple Lori Nichols’ enchanting debut features an irresistible, free-spirited, nature-loving little girl who greets the changing seasons and a new sibling with arms wide open. When Maple is tiny, her parents plant a maple tree in her honor. She and her tree grow up together, and even though a tree doesn’t always make an ideal playmate, it doesn’t mind when Maple is in the mood to be loud—which is often. Then Maple becomes a big sister, and finds that babies have their loud days, too. Fortunately, Maple and her beloved tree know just what the baby needs.
  64. Me . . . Jane In his characteristic heartwarming style, Patrick McDonnell tells the story of the young Jane Goodall and her special childhood toy chimpanzee named Jubilee. As the young Jane observes the natural world around her with wonder, she dreams of “a life living with and helping all animals,” until one day she finds that her dream has come true.
  65. Mouse Paint One day three white mice discover three jars of paint–red, blue, and yellow. Both parents and children alike will appreciate this lighthearted presentation of a lesson in color. “Walsh’s cut-paper collage illustrations have bold colors and just the right simplicity for the storyline. A real charmer that’s great fun as well as informative.”–School Library Journal
  66. Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! Tippy, tippy, tippy, Pat!That’s the sound three hungry bunnies make when the sun goes down and the moon comes up and Mr. McGreely’s garden smells yum, yum, yummy. While he’s dreaming of his mouth-watering carrots, the bunnies are diving over fences and swimming trenches to get the veggies first! Hammer, hammer, hammer, Saw! That’s the sound Mr. McGreely makes when the sun comes up and the moon goes down and he sees what those twitch-whiskers have done….Nibbled leaves! Empty stalks! Mr. McGreely will build something bigger and better, sure to keep even pesky puff-tails away. Children will cheer for the bunnies — or for Mr. McGreely — as they delight in Candace Fleming’s clever sound effects and G. Brian Karas’s vibrant, funny illustrations.
  67. My Lucky Day When a delicious-looking piglet knocks on Mr. Fox’s door “accidentally,” the fox can hardly believe his good luck. It’s not every day that dinner just shows up on your doorstep. It must be his lucky day! Or is it? Before Mr. Fox can say grace, the piglet has manipulated him into giving him a fabulously tasty meal, the full spa treatment (with bath and massage), and . . . freedom. In a funny trickster tale of her own, Kasza keeps readers guessing until the surprise ending when they’ll realize it was piglet’s lucky day all along.
  68. The Napping House Everyone knows the cumulative rhyme “This Is the House That Jack Built,” but The Napping House (1984) is close on its heels in the race for posterity: “And on that granny / there is a child / a dreaming child / on a snoring granny / on a cozy bed / in a napping house, / where everyone is sleeping.” Included in the napping house menagerie is a dozing dog, a snoozing cat, a slumbering mouse, and a wakeful flea who ends up toppling the whole sleep heap with one chomp! Don Wood’s delightfully detailed comical illustrations are bathed in moonlight blues until the sun comes up, then all is color and rainbows and a very awake household.
  69. No, David! The Caldecott Honor-winning classic by bestselling picture-book creator David Shannon! When David Shannon was five years old, he wrote and illustrated his first book. On every page were these words: NO, DAVID! . . . and a picture of David doing things he was not supposed to do. Now David is all grown up. But some things never change. . . . Over fifteen years after its initial publication, NO, DAVID! remains a perennial household favorite, delighting children, parents, and teachers alike. David is a beloved character, whose unabashed good humor, mischievous smile, and laughter-inducing antics underline the love parents have for their children–even when they misbehave.
  70. Olivia Have fun with Olivia… dressing up, singing songs, building sand castles, napping (maybe), dancing, painting on walls, and — whew! — going to sleep at last.
  71. One Blue is a quiet color. Red’s a hothead who likes to pick on Blue. Yellow, Orange, Green, and Purple don’t like what they see, but what can they do? When no one speaks up, things get out of hand — until One comes along and shows all the colors how to stand up, stand together, and count. As budding young readers learn about numbers, counting, and primary and secondary colors, they also learn about accepting each other’s differences and how it sometimes just takes one voice to make everyone count.
  72. One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish “From there to here, from here to there, funny things are everywhere” . . . So begins this classic Beginner Book by Dr. Seuss. Beginning with just five fish and continuing into flights of fancy, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish celebrates how much fun imagination can be. From the can-opening Zans to the boxing Gox to the winking Yink who drinks pink ink, the silly rhymes and colorful cast of characters create an entertaining approach to reading that will have every child giggling from morning to night: “Today is gone. Today was fun. Tomorrow is another one.”
  73. Otis New York Times bestselling author/artist Loren Long creates an unforgettable children’s classic. Otis is a special tractor. He loves his farmer and he loves to work. And he loves the little calf in the next stall, whom he purrs to sleep with his soft motor. In fact, the two become great friends: they play in the fields, leap hay bales, and play ring-around-the-rosy by Mud Pond. But when Otis is replaced with the big yellow tractor, he is cast away behind the barn, unused, unnoticed . . . until the little calf gets stuck in Mud Pond. Then there is only one tractor—and it’s not big or yellow—who can come to the rescue. It is little old Otis who saves his friend. It is Otis who saves the day. In a wonderful new palette, and in the tradition of classics like Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel and The Story of Ferdinand, Loren Long has crafted an unforgettable new story—and character—celebrating the power of friendship and perseverance.
  74. Over and Over ‘The year’s seasonal changes and festivities that are important in a little child’s life are imaginatively [described]. . . . The story ends with the happy realization that it will all come round ‘over and over’ again.’
  75. Owl Babies “I want my mommy!” Three baby owls awake one night to find their mother gone, and they can’t help but wonder where she is. What is she doing? When will she be back? What scary things move all around them? Stunning illustrations from striking perspectives capture the anxious little owls as they worry. Not surprisingly, joyous flapping and dancing and bouncing greet the mother’s return, lending a celebratory tone to the ending of this comforting tale. Never has the plight of young ones who miss their mother been so simply told or so beautifully rendered.
  76. A Pet for Petunia Meet Petunia. More than anything, Petunia wants a pet. “I’ll feed my pet every day,” she promises her parents.“I’ll take her for walks. I’ll read stories to her and draw her pictures.” Petunia knows she can take care of a pet, but what happens when the pet she most desires is a skunk?
  77. Press Here Press the yellow dot on the cover of this book, follow the instructions within, and embark upon a magical journey! Each page of this surprising book instructs the reader to press the dots, shake the pages, tilt the book, and who knows what will happen next! Children and adults alike will giggle with delight as the dots multiply, change direction, and grow in size! Especially remarkable because the adventure occurs on the flat surface of the simple, printed page, this unique picture book about the power of imagination and interactivity will provide read-aloud fun for all ages!
  78. The Rainbow FishThe Rainbow Fish is an international best-seller and a modern classic. Eye-catching foil stamping, glittering on every page, offers instant child appeal, but it is the universal message at the heart of this simple story about a beautiful fish who learns to make friends by sharing his most prized possessions that gives the book its lasting value.
  79. Rosie’s Walk Rosie the hen leaves the chicken coop and sets out for a little walk. Right behind her is the fox, slyly trying to catch up with her. Rosie’s walk is quiet, uneventful and eventually leads her back to the coop, blissfully unaware of the fox’s travails as he tries — unsuccessfully — to navigate the obstacle course that Rosie has led him through.
  80. The Runaway Bunny Since its publication in 1942, The Runaway Bunny has never been out of print. Generations of sleepy children and grateful parents have loved the classics of Margaret Wise Brown and Clement Hurd, including Goodnight Moon. The Runaway Bunny begins with a young bunny who decides to run away: “‘If you run away,’ said his mother, ‘I will run after you. For you are my little bunny.'” And so begins a delightful, imaginary game of chase. No matter how many forms the little bunny takes–a fish in a stream, a crocus in a hidden garden, a rock on a mountain–his steadfast, adoring, protective mother finds a way of retrieving him. The soothing rhythm of the bunny banter–along with the surreal, dream-like pictures–never fail to infuse young readers with a complete sense of security and peace. For any small child who has toyed with the idea of running away or testing the strength of Mom’s love, this old favorite will comfort and reassure.
  81. Stuck When Floyd’s kite gets stuck in a tree, he’s determined to get it out. But how? Well, by knocking it down with his shoe, of course. But strangely enough, it too gets stuck. And the only logical course of action . . . is to throw his other shoe. Only now it’s stuck! Surely there must be something he can use to get his kite unstuck. An orangutan? A boat? His front door? Yes, yes, and yes. And that’s only the beginning.
  82. The Tale of Peter Rabbit The Tale of Peter Rabbit is the original classic by Beatrix Potter. The Tale of Peter Rabbit was first published by Frederick Warne in 1902 and endures as Beatrix Potter’s most popular and well-loved tale. It tells the story of a very mischievous rabbit and the trouble he encounters in Mr McGregor’s vegetable garden!
  83. Toot & Puddle Toot and Puddle are the best of friends. But when Toot leaves Woodcock Pocket to travel and see the world, Puddle chooses to stay at home. Just when Puddle begins to miss his old friend, he embarks on some of his own adventures-right at home. Finally, after Toot returns from his year-long trip, the two discover that true friendship knows no boundaries.
  84. The Very Hungry Caterpillar “In the light of the moon a little egg lay on a leaf.” So begins Eric Carle’s modern classic, The Very Hungry Caterpillar. More than 12 million copies of this book have been sold in its original, full-sized edition, and the beloved tale of science and gluttony has been translated into 20 languages.
  85. We’re Going on a Bear Hunt A father and his four children–a toddler, a preschool boy and two older girls–go on the traditional bear hunt based on the old camp chant: “We’re going to catch a big one. / What a beautiful day! / We’re not scared. / Oh-oh! Grass! / Long, wavy grass. / We can’t go over it. / We can’t go under it. / Oh, no! / We’ve got to go through it!” The family skids down a grassy slope, swishes across a river, sludges through mud and, of course, finally sees the bear, who chases them all back to their home. It’s a fantastic journey–was it real or imagined?–with the family’s actions (and interaction) adding to the trip a goodnatured, jolly mood.
  86. Where the Wild Things Are The wild things–with their mismatched parts and giant eyes–manage somehow to be scary-looking without ever really being scary; at times they’re downright hilarious. Sendak’s defiantly run-on sentences–one of his trademarks–lend the perfect touch of stream of consciousness to the tale, which floats between the land of dreams and a child’s imagination. This Sendak classic is more fun than you’ve ever had in a wolf suit, and it manages to reaffirm the notion that there’s no place like home.
  87. Whistle for Willie Board Book When Whistle for Willie was first published in 1964, The New York Times wrote “Mr. Keats’ illustrations boldly, colorfully capture the child, his city world. and the shimmering heat of a summer’s day.”

 

 

Disclosure: Maureen Sklaroff is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. This post may contain Amazon or other affiliate links. All opinions expressed, however, are 100% my own. To read my full disclosure policy, click here.
Maureen

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