Easter Egg Geodes | From Blue Bells and Cockle ShellsWe originally made these Easter egg geodes a couple of years ago, following directions from Martha Stewart’s website. Unfortunately, since then, Martha has removed her directions! Fortunately, I had saved some of the notes I made when we made these geodes the first time. Unfortunately, the notes were not detailed enough, so it took four attempts to get these right! All in all, I am glad that Sola asked to make these Easter egg geodes early so we had time to get things just right. Here is how we made them.

You will need:

Easter Egg Geodes | From Blue Bells and Cockle ShellsDirections:

  • Cut your eggs in half lengthwise. I found that the best way to do this was to barely crack the egg on the end, like you would if you were going to cook with it and then to use the scissors to cut the egg the rest of the way (I did not blow the egg insides out, so this was a messy job). I did also experiment with a sharp knife, but it did not work as well.
  • Clean and thoroughly dry the eggs shell halves (I found that the best way to dry the shells was to just let them sit overnight)
  • Use a q-tip, paint brush, or your finger to coat the inside of the egg shells with white glue
  • Sprinkle alum on the inside of the shells, until they are thoroughly coated
  • Allow the shells to dry overnight

Easter Egg Geodes | From Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

  • The next day, dissolve 2 cups of alum into 5 cups of boiling water (some how this left us with only 6 cups of solution???)
  • Allow the solution to cool for 10  minutes, stirring constantly
  • Pour 3/4 cup solution into each of the 8 jars

Easter Egg Geodes | From Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

  • Add food coloring to each jar and stir with a craft stick until you achieve your desired color

Easter Egg Geodes | From Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

  • Slowly lower one eggs shell into each jar, using a spoon to push the egg shell under the solution if the shell floats

Easter Egg Geodes | From Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

  • Cover the jars with lids and allow them to sit overnight

Easter Egg Geodes | From Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

  • Gently remove the egg shell halves from the jars, using a spoon and set them out to dry

Easter Egg Geodes | From Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

  • Once they are completely dry, you will have beautiful egg crystal “geodes”

So why don’t you try making some Easter egg geodes with your child? It is relatively easy and the results are stunning. Be sure to buy your alum in bulk from somewhere, or you’ll end up spending a fortune on it.

Disclosure: Maureen Sklaroff is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. This post may contain Amazon or other affiliate links. All opinions expressed, however, are 100% my own. To read my full disclosure policy, click here.
Maureen
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