Month: March 2016

Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle ShellsEvery year, Sola and I try to decorate Easter eggs using a different method(s) than the year before. This year, we decided to try our hand at making tie dye Easter eggs using Sharpies. Gohan had used this process to make tie dye t-shirts at a summer camp many years ago, but whenever I tried to reproduce the effect at home, I couldn’t get it to work. I actually had decided that Sharpie must have changed their formula or something. Then, several months ago, someone else mentioned doing a Sharpie tie dye project and emphasized that the secret is to use 99% isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol). Sure enough, that was my problem! So now, we’ve been going a bit tie dye crazy trying this technique on a variety of things.

Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

Supplies:

  • Eggs (we used eggs that had been blown, cleaned, and dried (if you decide to use hard boiled eggs, I really don’t recommend eating them afterwards as both the Sharpie and the alcohol probably seep through the shell)
  • Sharpie markers in assorted colors
  • 99% isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol – MUST be 99%)
  • Eye dropper

Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle ShellsTechnique:

  • Using your sharpie markers, color your egg anyway you want, but try not to mix super dark colors with very light colors, as the dark colors will run into the light colors. Also, it can be to not to get fingerprints all over the eggs when you are working with the dark colors.Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells
  • We found that abstract designs work best. Sola kept trying to draw scenes on her eggs, but then the rubbing alcohol causes the design to spread and smear and she found that very frustrating.Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells
  • Using the eye dropper, drip the rubbing alcohol on to the egg (try to drip only one drop at a time, or else the colors may run too much)

Here are other “before and after” pairs that we made. The multi-colored scribbles on this egg…

Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

…ran together to look almost like melted crayon.

Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

The plaid design below…Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

…ended up mostly showing the vertical red strips, while the green, yellow, and orange become more of a blur in the background. Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

This rainbow design gives you a good idea about how well each color holds up when the alcohol is dripped on it. Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

The lighter colors get much lighter, but the dark colors stay very strong.Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

For younger children…Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

…even simple scribbles blend nicely into a lovely design.Tie Dye Easter Eggs | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

This was an easy egg dying project. It would be really easy to pull together if you have a last minute egg dying job to do and don’t want to break out the food coloring.

Have you colored your Easter eggs this year? Do you have a favorite dying method? Please do tell in the comments below!

Our Favorite Saint Patrick's Day Books for Kids | from Blue Bells and Cockle Shells

Saint Patrick’s Day is coming up soon, but that’s still plenty of time to read some St. Patrick’s Day books with your kids. This year, we found several new books to add to our St. Patrick’s Day book basket. Clever Tom and the Leprechaun: An Old Irish Story – Clever Tom Fitzpatrick thinks his fortune […]

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Last year, for Easter, Sola and I experimented with dyeing eggs with silk. For the most part, the eggs turned out quite lovely, worth saving for future Easters. We did learn a few things in the process that are worth mentioning thoughIn regards to 100% silk sources, a lot of Pinterest tutorials that I saw, […]

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